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Monday, July 13, 2020 | History

3 edition of Synoptical list of North American species of Ceanothus found in the catalog.

Synoptical list of North American species of Ceanothus

by Trelease, William

  • 179 Want to read
  • 29 Currently reading

Published by s.n. in S.l .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementby William Trelease
SeriesCIHM/ICMH Microfiche series = CIHM/ICMH collection de microfiches -- no. 40143, CIHM/ICMH microfiche series -- no. 40143
ContributionsCalifornia Academy of Sciences
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination1 microfiche (10 fr.)
Number of Pages10
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24505814M
ISBN 100665401434

Age at which deer brush sprouts first produce seed is undocumented; however, sprouts of most Ceanothus species produce seed after 3 to 6 years. When deer brush plants are top-killed before they become decadent, roots remain alive, and root crowns retain the ability to sprout for years beyond the year life expectancy of other stem tissue. CHECK AVAILABILITY. FIRST IMPRESSIONS: Ceanothus americanus is an upright mounding shrubby perennial with fine textured gray-green leaves. The foliage is serrate and reticulate with the veins marked by shallow grooves. In summer, plants are adorned with many white rounded flower panicles.

Ceanothus arcuatus McMinn in M. van Rensselaer and H. McMinn, Ceanothus. , fig. [E] Arching ceanothus Arching ceanothus Shrubs, – m, ascending or spreading, not rooting at nodes; branchlets brown to grayish brown, ± rigid, tomentulose, sometimes fascicled, axillary short shoots ascending to spreading; petiole 1–2 mm; blade flat. Species 58 (51 in the flora): North America, Mexico, Central America (Costa Rica, Guatemala, Panama). Among the Ceanothus species found in the flora area, only three occur entirely east of the Rocky Mountains. Among the remaining species, a few of which are widespread in western North America, 42 are endemic to the California Floristic Province.

During the time of the Revolutionary War, the American colonists began making their own tea as a substitute for the expensive Chinese or British tea. The leaves of this nitrogen-fixing native shrub, which grew abundantly in New Jersey, could be used to make a beverage much like black tea. Native American women often used the fragrant flowers as a soap, since they produce a gentle lather and 5/5(1). GENERAL DISTRIBUTION: Waveyleaf ceanothus is endemic to California. It is found in the North and South Coast Ranges, from Humbolt County south to Santa Cruz County. It also occurs in the Cuyamaca Mountains of San Diego County [].ECOSYSTEMS: FRES20 Douglas-fir FRES21 Ponderosa pine FRES27 Redwood FRES28 Western hardwoods FRES34 Chaparral - mountain shrub STATES: CA .


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Synoptical list of North American species of Ceanothus by Trelease, William Download PDF EPUB FB2

Title. Synoptical list of North American species of Ceanothus. Related Titles. Series: CIHM/ICMH microfiche series ; no. Trelease, William, California Academy of Sciences. Additional Physical Format: Print version: Trelease, William, Synoptical list of North American species of Ceanothus.

[Place of publication not identified]: [publisher not identified], [?]. Statistics. The Plant List includes scientific plant names of species rank for the genus these 62 are accepted species names.

The Plant List includes a further scientific plant names of infraspecific rank for the genus do not intend The Plant List to be complete for names of infraspecific rank. These are primarily included because names of species rank are. Ceanothus americanus is a species of shrub native to North America.

Common names include New Jersey tea, Jersey tea ceanothus, variations of red root (red-root; redroot), mountain sweet (mountain-sweet; mountainsweet), and wild snowball. New Jersey tea was a name coined during the American Revolution, because its leaves were used as a substitute for imported : Rhamnaceae.

Ceanothus is a genus of about 50–60 species of nitrogen-fixing shrubs and small trees in the buckthorn family (). Common names for members of this genus are buckbrush, California lilac, soap bush, or just ceanothus.

"Ceonothus" comes from a Greek word meaning "spiny plant", Ancient Greek: κεάνωθος (keanōthos), which was applied by Theophrastus (– BC) to an Old World plant Clade: Tracheophytes. Ceanothus is a large genus of diverse, versatile and beautiful North American species in the buckthorn family, Rhamnaceae.

Many are native to California, some endemic to Sonoma County. The genus includes over 60 shrubs, prostrate or mounding, often from ft. high, although native C. arboreus and C. thrysiflorus can become small trees up to ft. tall. Common names include California. Though it has an unrivaled range of blue flowers and includes plants suitable for many gardening and landscaping situations, this North American native genus has long been underutilized.

A complete horticultural and botanical treatment of the genus aimed at both gardeners and botanists, this book finally gives Ceanothus the recognition it deserves/5(6). Ceanothus griseus is a species of flowering shrub known by the common names Carmel ceanothus and Carmel creeper.

'Carmel' refers to the Carmel-by-the-Sea region in California. Description. The Ceanothus griseus shrub may exceed two meters-6 feet in height when mostly erect, or it can grow wider than tall.

The evergreen leaves are ribbed and Family: Rhamnaceae. ” tall x 36” wide. New Jersey Tea (Ceonothus americanus) plant is excellent for attracting hummingbirds. The luxuriant glossy leaves and bright white flowers make this durable shrub a real winner.

Plant two to three feet apart to create a low-growing, drought-tolerant native hedge. Ceanothus americanus is visited by hummingbirds, which eat the tiny insects that pollinate the : $ Ceanothus Concha, California Mountain Lilac. medium deer areas. If you have high deer problems stick with your local Ceanothus species and whatever you do, don't water (except for the first summer).

For more information on deer problems see the Deer Page. A note about yellow leaves on Ceanothus. One of the 'bugs' on Ceanothus is the Silk Moth.

Ceanothus, genus of North American shrubs, of the buckthorn family (Rhamnaceae), comprising about 55 species. The leaves are alternate or opposite. The very small blue or white flowers are borne in profuse, erect clusters. Ceanothus americanus, commonly called New Jersey tea, occurs from Canada to.

A taxonomically challenging group, the exact number of ceanothus species is hard to pin down, partly due to natural hybridization. Roughly 50 kinds occur in the wild and are distributed throughout North and Central America, with the majority found (about 40) in California.

Reasons: Ceanothus americanus occurs in eastern North America from eastern Canada south along the Atlantic coast and west to Texas. This species is relatively rare in the northeastern portion of the range, but common elsewhere.

americanus has been used for traditional medicine, but current commercial use is probably relatively minor. Ceanothus definition: any shrub of the North American rhamnaceous genus Ceanothus: grown for their ornamental, | Meaning, pronunciation, translations and examples.

Britton, N.L., and A. Brown. An illustrated flora of the northern United States, Canada and the British Possessions. 3 vols. Charles Scribner's Sons, New York. Ceanothus, Wild lilac—Ceanothus spp. Family Rhamnaceae (Buckthorn family) Plant identification.

Many species and varieties of Ceanothus are available. They can be evergreen shrubs, small trees, or groundcovers. Optimum conditions for growth. Ceanothus can grow in most climatic zones. Ceanothus americanus in the Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN), U.S.

Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service. Accessed on Oct Accessed on. Ceanothus (California lilac) is a beautiful shrub that will reward you with the most glorious lilac/blue/pink/white racemes of flowers in the spring and summer, depending on the variety. Ideal for a sunny, sheltered position, ceanothus are shrubs which can grow to 10 feet tall if planted in a sheltered, sunny position.

Ceanothus americanus L. is an accepted name This name is the accepted name of a species in the genus Ceanothus (family Rhamnaceae). The record derives from WCSP (in review) (data supplied on ) which reports it as an accepted name with original publication details: Sp.

Ceanothus L. – ceanothus Species: Ceanothus americanus L. – New Jersey tea Subordinate Taxa. This plant has no children Legal Status. Threatened and Endangered Information: This plant is listed by the U.S. federal government or a state. Native American Ethnobotany (University of Michigan -.

Ceanothus impressus in the Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN), U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service. Accessed on Oct Accessed on .This bibliography of forestry in California attempts to bring together such books, official reports and articles in periodicals as may appear serviceable to the forester or the non-professional student.

Third Biennial Rept. State Board of Forestry, pp. TRELEASE, Wm. Synoptical list of North American species of Cea- nothus. In.Species range from being treelike with a Ceanothus arborescens cultivar like Ray Hartman to spreading ground covers with Ceanothus 'Centennial' and Ceanothus hearstiorum.

A large number of hybrids and cultivars were developed during the drought in the 's .